Ingresse APP

Client: Ingresse

Year: 2014

Responsibilities: Creative direction, Visual Design, Front-end development, Requirements analysis, Information Architecture, Interaction Design, Research

Awards:

2015 - Oi Tela Viva Móvel, Mobile Cash Case (iOS) - Winner

2015 - AppCircus São Paulo, Best Android App - Finalist

Brazil is the second country with the largest number of events in the world, and the mission of Ingresse is to make easier to find and attend these events. The main goal of their app is to make it possible to discover events and buy tickets anywhere and anytime. Have you ever arrived at an event and you didn’t have the tickets yet? Don’t wait in line and miss the show anymore, just buy it on the Ingresse app and show the ticket on the app itself.

Since the website (and brand) was outdated and visually busy at the time we began designing the app, we decided not to follow its design (later the website redesign that followed the app design). So we started by sketching many different ideas. Our goal was to design a simple app focusing on two main functions: discovering new events and viewing the bought tickets. People wouldn’t be motivated to buy any ticket on the app if they couldn’t first easily find interesting events and view their bought tickets. So the purchase flow, although well thought out, was not the main concern (and later research confirmed that this indeed is one of the least important steps to users). So we made the events list the initial screen, without forcing the user to log in to see it, and we put the access to their bought tickets right as the first option on the main menu.

Due to time constraints, we quickly moved from sketching to implementation. We went through dozens of iterations and we tested the app out in the wild by releasing updates frequently throughout the year. We slowly shaped the brand: we stripped most colors away and used predominantly white, since the different event posters were already colorful enough.

The latest main updates to the app design were: changing the initial screen to one that displayed the main event categories; and creating an screen dedicated to search, instead of putting the search only available on the events list screen. Later we conducted usability tests with our two main group of costumer users, and although the new initial screen and the categories were well accepted, the dedicated search screen did not work quite has we expected. The event search engine needs to be way more intelligent than it is today in order to meet users expectations and their ways of use. We also conducted field interviews with costumers during different events and sent surveys in order to improve the app. Major updates to the app might still kick in any time soon based on the results of our last researches. The app is currently available for Android and iOS.